The Latest

Sep 1, 2014 / 31 notes

(via ana-rosa)

Aug 31, 2014 / 519,682 notes

(via goldenxpvssy)

Aug 31, 2014 / 9,239 notes

(via goldenxpvssy)

Aug 31, 2014
jessehimself:

lokicolouredglasses:

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.
Aug 30, 2014 / 329,517 notes

jessehimself:

lokicolouredglasses:

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

(via thesaltycrew)

Aug 29, 2014 / 2,112 notes
I am tired of trying to hold things together that cannot be held. Trying to control what cannot be controlled. I am tired of denying myself what I want for fear of breaking things I cannot fix. They will break no matter what we do.
Celia, from The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (via mybibliophileside)
Aug 29, 2014 / 508 notes
what-id-wear:

What I’d Wear : The Outfit Database

(source : The Little Magpie )
Aug 29, 2014 / 666 notes
Aug 28, 2014 / 2,518 notes

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via npr)

vartanm:

Arevik Gevorgyan in Armenian male attire (taraz)Photo by Emma Marashlyan
Aug 28, 2014 / 3 notes

vartanm:

Arevik Gevorgyan in Armenian male attire (taraz)
Photo by Emma Marashlyan

Aug 27, 2014 / 2,518 notes

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via npr)

Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.
Leonardo da Vinci (via kushandwizdom)

(via mybeautifuldarkktwist3dfantasy)

Aug 27, 2014 / 2,939 notes
Aug 26, 2014 / 111,902 notes

(via goldenxpvssy)

Aug 26, 2014 / 323 notes

(via ana-rosa)

Aug 26, 2014 / 359,430 notes

(via luxurae)